Blue Chip Fall Recruiting Tips
Posted Oct 6, 2016

Blue Chip 225 Tips for Rising Freshmen:
 

Find a Fall team. 

 

Check out Fall tournaments in your area.  Click here for search 

 

Check out and get registered for indoor /Winter lacrosse

 

Begin to define your goals - What division do you see yourself aiming toward?  (Check out the US Lacrosse Recruiting Guide for vital information.)

 

Plan your curriculum to meet NCAA core requirements.

 

Grades - you must graduate with at least a 2.0 in your core subjects to be considered eligible and the better your grades the more positive coaches will be toward you.

 

Recruiting:

You can make unofficial visits to a college campus.

It is also permissible for you to receive a maximum of three complimentary tickets to a college sporting event.
You can talk with college coaches but this must be on campus.
You can call a college coach, but he cannot call you or return your call. 

 

  

Blue Chip 225 Tips for Rising Sophomore:

 

 Take the PSAT as prep for the SAT test. (info and registration)

 

 Grades --- Grades --- Grades -- Keep them high.. Don't make it difficult for the college coach to clear you through Admissions. He may decide not to try.

 

 Think about what you want out of college: size, location, academics, and make a list of the schools that seem to fit.  You can find lists of schools in each division at the NCAA Eligibility Center .

 

You may want to establish a personalized recruiting profile with NCSA, the nation's largest recruiting support program.  The sooner you put your profile in place the more detailed it will be for your college recruiting.    

 

Get fit and stay fit - Sounds obvious?  Don't spend the season reaching peak condition.  Develop a reasonable work out plan and stick with it.  There are many good online training programs, and  

here is one to start with.  

 

Recruiting:

You can make unofficial visits to a college campus.

It is also permissible for you to receive a maximum of three complimentary tickets to a college sporting event.
You can talk with college coaches but this must be on campus.
You can call a college coach but he cannot call you or return your call. 


 

Blue Chip 225 Tips for Rising Juniors:

 

School starts about the same time as coaches are allowed to contact you.  Give your best work and attention to both.  Respond right away to any communication from coaches. 

 

The quality of EVERYTHING you do with coaches is part of how you are evaluated. This includes the questionnaires you received from colleges and any notes you write to them. In reviewing your material, the number of spelling mistakes (including misspelling the names of the colleges themselves) is of concern. If you aren't serious enough to get the spelling and typing right a coach will wonder how serious you are about your sport.

 

Many colleges will send you questionnaires. Fill them out and return them quickly and accurately.

 

Sign up for Fall tournaments and email coaches in the schools you're thinking about your tournament schedule.

 

Make visits to colleges and begin to narrow your list to maybe a dozen that seem to be a fit for you and that seem within your ability range.  As with your choices of colleges, pick some "safe bets", some good choices, and some "reach" schools.  Find the balance between selling yourself short and being a 5'2" guard in the NBA.

 

Grades - Grades - Grades - As you go through school it becomes more difficult to recover from low grade point average.  Be as serious about your academic achievements as your are your athletic ones.

 

Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center - This is important to ensure your eligibility.  You should do this at the start of your Junior Year. (information- Eligibility Center)

 

Get registered for SAT (SAT info - Register)

 

Recruiting:
Junior year from September 1

College coaches are allowed to send you information about their athletic program and about their school. this can include: media guides, schedule cards, personalized letters, photocopies of newspaper clippings and official university admissions and academic publications.
The college coach is now allowed to answer your emails and send emails to you as well.

 

Junior year from July 1

A college coach is only permitted to contact you in person off the college campus only on or after July 1st when you have completed your junior year of high school. If the coach meets with you or your parents and says anything to you or them then this is considered a contact. Anything more than a very basic hello is a contact.

College coaches are permitted to make one telephone call each week to you or your parents. You can call the coach as often as you wish.

 

 

 

  

Blue Chip 225 Tips for Rising Seniors:

 

You can make up to five Official - expense paid visits to college campuses. the visit to the campus cannot be longer than forty eight hours in duration. you are are not allowed to have an official visit until after your first day of classes of your senior year.

 

College coaches need to have an official ACT or SAT score and a copy of your official high school transcript before you can make a visit.

Coaches can make telephone calls and send written correspondence as per the rules for your junior year.

 

if your at a tournament and the coach does not talk to you don't take it personally. The National Collegiate Athletic Association has specific recruiting rules that puts limits on communication at tournaments.

A college coach can sit down with a guardian or parent at a competition site. This is counted as one of the three in-person off-campus recruiting contacts a coach is permitted

 

Do your official visits to your schools and consider what each one offers, where your academic and athletic goals are most likely to be realized.  

 

In early November the National Letters of Intent are sent and it is decision time. Consider carefully with focus on the things that will matter in years to come. Ask yourself  if you are permanently injured is this the place you want to be.  Know what the National Letter of Intent means for both you and the college.